Whitman School of Management at Syracuse University
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Abstract Details

ROLE DEMANDS, DIFFICULTY IN MANAGING WORK-FAMILY CONFLICT AND MINORITY ENTREPRENEURS
Vol. Volume 13, Number 3 September/2008

LOIS M. SHELTON

SHARON M. DANES

MICKI EISENMAN


By exploring difficulty in managing work-family conflict for minority entrepreneurs, this study considers work-family issues for business persons who have received little attention in the literature, yet form new businesses at rates exceeding the national average. We employ a role theory perspective to examine two major research questions using a nationally representative sample of African-American, Mexican-American, Korean-American, and White business owners. Specifically, we ask do minority business owners experience greater difficulty in managing conflicts between work and family roles when compared to White entrepreneurs? And does difficulty in managing work–family conflict negatively impact business performance? Empirical results show that Korean-American and Mexican-American entrepreneurs have greater role demands, and subsequently, higher levels of difficulty in managing work-family conflict than African Americans and Whites. Furthermore, difficulty in managing work-family conflict negatively impacts business performance whether performance is measured through the perception of the business owner, or through more objective financial measures. We contribute to the literature on minority entrepreneurs as well as expand the work-family conflict literature by shifting the focus from employed individuals to entrepreneurs and by emphasizing the effect of such conflict on performance rather than well-being.



Keywords: work-family conflict, minority entrepreneurs, role theory.